September 15, 2014
"No national sovereignty rules in outer space. Those who venture there go as envoys of the entire human race. Their quest, therefore, must be for all mankind, and what they find should belong to all mankind."

President Lyndon B. Johnson (via whats-out-there)

(via ritterlied)

September 15, 2014
cuirassier:

Prussian cuirassiers, post 1762
1 Standard bearer, 13th cuirassiers ( Garde du Corps)
2 Officer, 13th Cuirassiers ( Garde du Corps)
3 Trumpeter, 10th Cuirassiers (Gens d’armes)
4 Officer, 12th Cuirassiers
Illustrated by Bryan Fosten

cuirassier:

Prussian cuirassiers, post 1762

1 Standard bearer, 13th cuirassiers ( Garde du Corps)

2 Officer, 13th Cuirassiers ( Garde du Corps)

3 Trumpeter, 10th Cuirassiers (Gens d’armes)

4 Officer, 12th Cuirassiers

Illustrated by Bryan Fosten

September 10, 2014

panzerbjoern:

An homage to the French Cavalry of the First Empire, who knew nothing of fear, and everything of tenacity. 

(via joachimmurat)

September 10, 2014
art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right
by Randy McCall
Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.
Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.
Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.
Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.
The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.
One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.
Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.
So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.
A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right

  • by Randy McCall

Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.

Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.

Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.

Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.

The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.

One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.

Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.

So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.

A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

September 1, 2014
inhumanblue:

[Pompeo Batoni, Il Colonello William Gordon, 1766]

inhumanblue:

[Pompeo Batoni, Il Colonello William Gordon, 1766]

(via joachimmurat)

September 1, 2014
tacerror:

Guards Cuirassiers of the Second French Empire by Georges Scott from the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection.

tacerror:

Guards Cuirassiers of the Second French Empire by Georges Scott from the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection.

(via joachimmurat)

August 26, 2014

old hollywood beauty icons from my sketchbook → x/→ x

(via e-pic)

August 26, 2014
cuirassier:

Cossacks Attacked by the Guard of Honor during Napoleon’s Russian Campaign - E. Detaille

cuirassier:

Cossacks Attacked by the Guard of Honor during Napoleon’s Russian Campaign - E. Detaille

August 26, 2014

thranduart:

yungtapatio:

Actors revisit their famous movie roles

PERFECTION

(Source: ed-pool, via praxjarvin)

August 26, 2014
giftvintage:

anna held

giftvintage:

anna held

(via joachimmurat)

August 26, 2014
ritasv:

'Annie Laurie' by W. L. Taylor

ritasv:

'Annie Laurie' by W. L. Taylor

(Source: wltaylor.info, via joachimmurat)

August 26, 2014

gentlemaninkhaki:

Types of the British Army, 1780. Series of four engravings by Bowles and Carver.

1. Heavy and Light Dragoon Officers

2. Grenadier and Infantry Officers

3. Grenadier Private and Infantry Sergeant (the first is labeled as a ‘drummer’ by ASKB- Though, in addition to wearing infantry crossbelts he lacks any of the drummers’ distinguishing lace. Indeed, the only rationale behind giving him this title is where he has chosen to sit- i.e., on a drum.)

4. A Drummer and Fifer (The Genuine Article- Note outline of lace)

(Source: library.brown.edu, via joachimmurat)

August 25, 2014
fapoleon-bonerparte:

Napoleon and his Generals
Raymond Desvarreux-Larpenteur, 1876-1961

fapoleon-bonerparte:

Napoleon and his Generals

Raymond Desvarreux-Larpenteur, 1876-1961

(via grenadierfifer)

August 23, 2014

art-of-swords:

Hand and a Half Sword with the coat of arms of the Holstein family of Reventlow

  • Dated: 1563
  • Culture: probably North German
  • Measurements: overall lenght 124.5 cm; handle lenght 22 cm; weight: approximately 1.6kg

The dated on the blade is referring to the The Northern Seven Years’ War between the Kingdom of Sweden and a coalition of Denmark–Norway, Lübeck and the Polish–Lithuanian union. The sword was part of a collection of weapons which was sold in Denmark, Gaunö, 1930.

The handle is composed of a wood grip with leather wrap and bell shaped pommel to act as a counter weight. The guard is simple set of straight quillons (22 cm wide) which has also a clam shell guard.

The blade is double edged with part of the reverse side holding an edge. The blade has a single fuller on either side and is inscribed with "NEC TEMERENEC TIMIDE AD 1563" and "INTER ARMA SILENT LEGE". Close to the guard you can also find several marking on either side of the blade and also the coat of arms on one side.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Antiques Armoury

August 22, 2014

joachimmurat:

salparadisewasright:

joachimmurat:

salparadisewasright:

joachimmurat:

syuminiki:

Murat on horseback

The best place for Murat to be!

The sort of man who could shout “Away, noble steed!” without the least hint of pretension or irony.

And I bet he did.

"There’s some dudes over there, and I’m gonna fight ‘em!”

"Hi, I’m Joachim Murat, and welcome to Jackass!"